Flight School

Because great training makes great pilots.

Ever heard the phrase, "The sky's the limit'? Well, it's true, unless you're a pilot!

Horizon instructors have trained helicopter pilots from all occupations and all ages. We have successfully taught students from 15 to 78 years old and even the completed the licensing of the first deaf helicopter pilot in the country! Our instructors have extensive training, proven in-flight coaching techniques and an outstanding record of safety and are willing to share their skills to help you complete your Private, Commercial, Rotary Wing Add-on, ATP Rating or CFI license. Many of our students have gone on to fly for our country in the military over Iraq and Afghanistan, for police departments and government agencies as well as for large companies in the private sector.

We have been in business since 1982 and are conveniently located close to Philadelphia, New York and Washington. The Enstrom is equipped for IFR training and Horizon offers additional options too as we have a low cost simulator available for VFR and IFR training as well as our own on-site maintenance staff.

By learning from the best and acquiring the same skills our pilots have been perfecting for almost 30 years, youll be able to take confident command of your aircraft. Your knowledge and solid foundation will enable you to make better decisions and reach your goals; whether simply to take friends and business associates up for an unforgettable experience or to pursue your ambition to be a professional pilot.

This vocation, unlike many others, demands that we challenge ourselves to discover the patience, determination, focus and self-discipline, which generates success. All of us at Horizon take pride in helping you meet this challenge.

You may be asking, "What topics will we cover in ground school and how come I just can't learn in the cockpit?

The basics always come first. There's a lot to cover when it comes to the big blue sky and we start at the beginning so that when the time comes for you to show off your skills, you know you'll be ready. That starts in ground school. But don't worry -- We're here to help!

You'll learn about:

  • Aerodynamics
  • Radio Navigation
  • Communications
  • Flight Operations
  • Weather
  • FAA Regulations
  • Aircraft Systems
  • Aircraft Performance
  • Flight Instruments
  • Weather Service
  • Enroute Flight

All taught with video, pictures stories from old and new pilots with lots
and lots of real-world examples!

We'll make it easy for you to obtain all of the materials you'll need. They're available for purchase from our Flight Training Department.

prim train

Weekly training flights develop skill and confidence ...

We recommend a training schedule that includes a 1 hour flight each week flight for approx. 9-12 months before you will qualify for your private license. You will learn how to control the aircraft in different conditions and to perform all of the following flight maneuvers and more.

  • Straight and level flight
  • Climbs
  • Decents
  • Coordinated turns
  • Using the radio
  • Approach patterns
  • Emergency procedures
  • Night flight
  • Solo flight
  • Navigating around the airport

After passing your medical exam and written knowledge test, you'll prepare for your oral exam and final check ride with an FAA Examiner. Once completed and signed off, you'll have your license and are free to fly with passengers and explore the area!

280fx

Enstrom 280FX

Our primary training helicopter.  It has a 3-bladed (fully articulated) rotor system with a 225 hp turbocharged Lycoming engine.

  • Fuel: 100 Octane Low-lead, 40 Gallon Capacity
  • Empty/Max Weight: 1,707.6 lbs. / 2,600 lbs.
  • Useful Load: 880 lbs.
  • Seating: Three Adults (including Pilot)
  • Flight Range: 2 Hours
  • Cruise Speed: 90 mph
  • Max Speed: 117 mph

 206bell

Bell 206 "Jet Ranger"

Our charter service, utility and passenger helicopter.  It has a 2-bladed rotor system with a turbine engine that produces more than 420 hp.  It even has air conditioning!

  • Fuel Type: "Jet A" Jet fuel, 91 Gallon Capacity
  • Empty/Max Weight: 1,902 lbs. / 3,350 lbs.
  • Useful Load: 1,487 lbs.
  • Seating: Five Adults (including Pilot)
  • Flight Range: 4.5 Hours
  • Cruise Speed: 115 mph
  • Max Speed: 126 mph

FAA License Requirements - Private Pilot (Part 61)

    • 40 Hours of total Flight Time
    • 7.5 Hours of which can be accrued in our on-site Flight Simulator
    • The Breakdown: 32.5 Hours (Helicopter) & 7.5 Hours (Simulator)

-30 Hours Dual Flight Time
-10 Hours Solo Flight Time
-6 Hours of Cross Country Flight Time (3 dual/3 solo)
-3 Hours Dual Night Flight Time
-Takeoffs and landings in airport traffic areas.

Don't forget -- As a special bonus, our weekly Private Pilot Ground School is included when you fly with us!

FAA License Requirements - Commercial Pilot (Part 61)

  • Total Flight Time: 150 Hrs.; including at least -
    • 100 hrs. in any powered aircraft (25 hours may be in Horizons FTD*)
    • 50 hrs. in Helicopters
  • Pilot In Command (PIC): Minimum 100 Hrs.; including at least
    • 35 hrs. in Helicopters
    • 10 hrs. of Cross-Country in Helicopters
  • Training: (Dual Instruction)
    • 20 Hours, including at least:

- 5 hrs. Instrument training in a helicopter, FTD*, ATD or simulator
- 2 hrs. Day VFR Cross Country flight in a Helicopter (50 NM)
- 2 hrs. Night VFR Cross Country flight in a Helicopter (50 NM)
- 3 hrs. of Practical Test Preparation in a Helicopter within 60 days of the Checkride

  • Solo or Dual as PIC:

• 50 NM Cross Country w/ a minimum of 3 landings (no time specified)
• At least 5 hrs. Night VFR w/ 10 Takeoffs & Landings

*Horizons FLYIT! Professional Simulator Flight Training Device (FTD) can be used to satisfy a maximum of 25 hrs. of the total flight time requirements and may be used half for the 5 hrs. of Instrument training. Also, Horizons weekly class is available at no extra charge for students working on a Commercial Helicopter Rating at Horizon.

FAA License Requirements - Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Part 61

1) To be eligible for an Helicopter-Rotorcraft Airline Transport Pilot certificate, a person must:

a. Be at least 23 years of age
b. Meet at least one of the following requirements:

i. Holds a commercial pilot certificate with an instrument rating issued under this part;
ii. Meet the military experience requirements under §61.73 of this part to qualify for a commercial pilot certificate,
and an instrument rating if the person is a rated military pilot or former rated military pilot in the US Armed Forces.

2) A person who is applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a rotorcraft category and helicopter class rating, must
have at least 1,200 hours of total time as a pilot that includes at least:

a. 500 hours of cross-country flight time;
b. 100 hours of night flight time, of which 15 hours are in helicopters;
c. 200 hours of flight time in helicopters, which includes at least 75 hours as a pilot in command, or as second in command performing the duties of a pilot in command under the supervision of a pilot in command, or any combination thereof; and
d. 75 hours of instrument flight time in actual or simulated instrument meteorological conditions, of which at least 50 hours are obtained in flight with at least 25 hours in helicopters as a pilot in command, or as second in command
performing the duties of a pilot in command under the supervision of a pilot in command, or any combination thereof.

i. Training in a flight simulator or flight training device may be credited toward the instrument flight time requirements, subject to the following:

1. Training in a flight simulator or a flight training device must be accomplished in a flight simulator or flight training device that represents a rotorcraft.
2. An applicant may receive credit for not more than a total of 25 hours of simulated instrument time in a flight simulator and flight training device.

3) Pass a knowledge test (Written Exam) on aeronautical knowledge areas;

a. Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to airline transport pilot privileges, limitations, and flight operations;
b. Meteorology, including knowledge of and effects of fronts, frontal characteristics, cloud formations, icing, and upper- air data;
c. General system of weather and NOTAM collection, dissemination, interpretation, and use;
d. Interpretation and use of weather charts, maps, forecasts, sequence reports, abbreviations, and symbols;
e. National Weather Service functions as they pertain to operations in the National Airspace System;
f. Windshear and microburst awareness, identification, and avoidance;
g. Principles of air navigation under instrument meteorological conditions in the National Airspace System;
h. Air traffic control procedures and pilot responsibilities as they relate to en route operations, terminal area and radar operations, and instrument departure and approach procedures;
i. Aircraft loading, weight and balance, use of charts, graphs, tables, formulas, and computations, and their effect on aircraft performance;
j. Aerodynamics relating to an aircraft's flight characteristics and performance in normal and abnormal flight regimes;
k. Human factors;
l. Aeronautical decision making and judgment;
m. Crew resource management to include crew communication and coordination;

4) Pass the practical test (Checkride).

* This section covers most cases of obtaining an ATP rating, however, there may be additional scenarios to consider based on other factors. Be sure to talk with us about your current flight and military experience prior to making a final decision about your flight training needs.

FAA License Requirements - Instrument Rating (Part 61)

Requirements:
Instrument Rating Applicants must have at least a Private Pilot License & a valid 3rd Class (or better) FAA medical certificate.

Flight Time:
50 Hours Cross Country PIC Flight Time (10 must be in a helicopter) This includes flights to satisfy prior ratings 40 Hours Actual or Simulated Instrument training (dual); including

- Up to 20 hours may be in a Simulator or Flight Training Device (FTD)*
- 100 NM IFR Cross Country Flight in a helicopter
- 3 Hrs. of Preparation for the practical test (Checkride) within 60 days of the test

Some of the required training hours would already have been completed during your Private Pilot training and will count towards your Instrument rating.

Instrument training, including all FTD time, will count towards your total time if you intend to obtain a Commercial License.

*Horizon's FLYIT! Professional Simulator Flight Training Device (FTD) can be used to satisfy a maximum of 50 % of the minimum flight training requirements.

** Horizon may not always have sufficient Instrument Students to justify a weekly group Ground School, Individualized Ground Instruction is available for a fee; or, Instrument Students may utilize Home Study courses on their own. Call for details.

FAA License Requirements - Helicopter Flight Instructor (Part 61)

To be eligible for a helicopter flight instructor certificate or rating a person must:

1) Hold either a Commercial Pilot certificate or Airline Transport Pilot certificate with:

a. A Rotorcraft - Helicopter rating

b. There are no minimum hours required specifically for the CFI rating.

2) An instrument rating is not required for a Helicopter Flight Instructor

3) A person who is applying for a flight instructor certificate for a rotorcraft category rating with a helicopter class rating must receive and log flight and ground training from an authorized instructor on the areas of operation listed below.

a. Fundamentals of instructing;
b. Technical subject areas;
c. Preflight preparation;
d. Preflight lesson on a maneuver to be performed in flight;
e. Preflight procedures;
f. Airport and heliport operations;
g. Hovering maneuvers;
h. Takeoffs, landings, and go-arounds;
i. Fundamentals of flight;
j. Performance maneuvers;
k. Emergency operations;
l. Special operations; and
m. Postflight procedures.

4) Pass a knowledge test (Written Exam) on the Fundamentals of Instruction (FOI) areas unless the applicant:

a. Holds a flight instructor certificate or ground instructor certificate issued by the FAA;
b. Holds a teacher's certificate issued by a State, county, city, or municipality that authorizes the person to teach at an educational level of the 7th grade or higher; or
c. Is employed as a teacher at an accredited college or university.

5) The Fundamentals of Instruction Knowledge Test, includes:

a. The learning process;

i. Elements of effective teaching;
ii. Student evaluation and testing;

b. Course development;
c. Lesson planning; and
d. Classroom training techniques.

6) Pass a Knowledge Test (Written Exam) on the aeronautical knowledge areas for a helicopter private and commercial pilot certificate.

7) Pass the required practical test (Also known as the Checkride, which includes a flight and oral portion).

FAA License Requirements - Instrument Helicopter Flight Instructor (Part 61)

To be eligible for a helicopter flight instructor certificate or rating a person must:

1) Hold either a Commercial Pilot certificate or Airline Transport Pilot certificate with:

a. A Rotorcraft - Helicopter rating
b. There are no minimum hours required specifically for the CFII rating.

2) An existing Rotorcraft-Helicopter Instrument rating is required for a Helicopter Instrument Flight Instructor

3) A person who is applying for an Instrument flight instructor certificate for a rotorcraft category rating with a helicopter class rating must receive and log flight and ground training from an authorized instructor on the areas of operation listed below.

a. Technical subject areas;
b. Preflight preparation;
c. Preflight lesson on a maneuver to be performed in flight;
d. Air traffic control clearances and procedures;
e. Flight by reference to instruments;
f. Navigation aids;
g. Instrument approach procedures;
h. Emergency operations; and
i. Postflight procedures

4) Pass a knowledge test (Written Exam) on the Fundamentals of Instruction (FOI) areas unless the applicant:

a. Holds a flight instructor certificate or ground instructor certificate issued by the FAA;
b. Holds a teacher's certificate issued by a State, county, city, or municipality that authorizes the person to teach at an educational level of the 7th grade or higher; or
c. Is employed as a teacher at an accredited college or university.

5) The Fundamentals of Instruction Knowledge Test, includes:

a. The learning process;

i. Elements of effective teaching;
ii. Student evaluation and testing;

b. Course development;
c. Lesson planning; and
d. Classroom training techniques.

6) Pass a Knowledge Test (Written Exam) on the aeronautical knowledge areas for a Rotorcraft-Helicopter Instrument Instructor Rating.

7) Pass the required practical test (Also known as the Checkride, which includes a flight and oral portion).

FAA License Requirements - Private Pilot (Part 141)

Flight Requirements:

  • 35 Hours Helicopter Flight Time
  • FLYIT! Professional Simulator Flight Training Device (FTD). An FTD can be used to satisfy a maximum of 15% of the total flight training requirements:

- 20 Hours Dual
- 15 Hours Solo
- 35 Hours ground training
- 35 Hours pre/post flight briefing

Remember: Maximum use of the FTD reduces your overall cost. Talk with us for details.

Physical Requirements:

  • Eighteen is the minimum age required by the Veterans Administration to obtain a pilot license under Part 141. There is no maximum age limit or restriction.
  • Applicants must be in good general health, with eyesight correctable to 20/20 and normal color vision.
  • A flight physical is required by an approved F.A.A. doctor before soloing.

Part 141 Ground School Summary:
Class meets weekly - Please call our office for details.

 

PRINCIPLES OF FLIGHT

  • Introduction To The Helicopter
  • Aerodynamics

 

THE FLIGHT ENVIRONMENT

  • Safety of Flight
  • Airports, Heliports & Airspace

 

HELICOPTER SYSTEMS & INSTRUMENTS

  • Flight Control Systems
  • Engines and Related Systems
  • Fuel and Electrical Systems
  • Powertrain Systems
  • Flight Instruments

 

AVIATION PHYSIOLOGY

  • Vision In-Flight
  • Spatial Disorientation
  • Respiration and Altitude
  • Alcohol, Drugs and Performance

 

FLIGHT PLANNING & DECISION-MAKING

  • Planning & Organizing Flights
  • Decision-Making
  • Cockpit Resource Management

 

BASIC NAVIGATION

  • Aeronautical Charts
  • Flight Computers (E6B)
  • Pilotage & Dead Reckoning
  • Sources of Flight Information

 

RADIO NAVIGATION

  • VOR, ADF, LORAN & GPS

 

COMMUNICATIONS & PERFORMANCE

  • Radio Communications
  • Radar and ATC Services
  • Predicting Performance
  • Weight and Balance

 

HOVERING OPERATIONS

  • Flying into Controlled Airspace
  • Proper Radio Use & Practice
  • Helicopter Ops at Controlled Airports

 

PRIMARY MANEUVERS

  • Straight and Level Flight
  • Climbs, Descents and Turns
  • Departures and Approaches

 

ADVANCED MANEUVERS

  • Maximum Performance Takeoff & Climb
  • High-Altitude Operations
  • Rapid Decelerations & Slope Operations
  • Night Operations

 

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

  • Autorotations
  • Emergency Situations
  • Systems and Equipment Malfunctions

 

METEOROLOGY FOR PILOTS

  • Basic Weather Theory.
  • Weather Patterns
  • Weather Hazards

 

INTERPRETING WEATHER DATA

  • Printed Reports and Forecasts
  • Graphic Weather Products
  • Sources of Weather Information

 

GROUND OPERATIONS

  • Preflight and Starting
  • Shutdown Procedures
  • Safety Considerations

 

SPECIAL OPERATIONS

  • Confined Area and Pinnacle Operations
  • Float Operations

FAA License Requirements - Commercial Pilot   (Part 141)

Flight Requirements:

  • 115 Hours Helicopter Flight Time
    FLYIT! Professional Simulator Flight Training Device (FTD). An FTD can be used to satisfy a maximum of 20% of the total flight training requirements:

- 30 Hours Dual
- 85 Hours Solo
- 30 Hours ground training
- 30 Hours pre/post flight briefing

Remember: Many of the required training hours would already have been completed during your Private Pilot training and count towards your Commercial requirements. Also, maximum use of the FTD reduces your overall cost. Talk with us for details.

Physical Requirements:

  • Eighteen is the minimum age required by the Veterans Administration to obtain a pilot license under Part 141. There is no maximum age limit or restriction.
  • Applicants must be in good general health, with eyesight correctable to 20/20 and normal color vision.
  • A flight physical is required by an approved F.A.A. doctor before soloing.

Part 141 Ground School Summary:
Class meets weekly - Please call our office for details.

PRINCIPLES OF FLIGHT

  • Introduction To The Helicopter
  • Aerodynamics

 

THE FLIGHT ENVIRONMENT

  • Safety of Flight
  • Airports, Heliports & Airspace

 

HELICOPTER SYSTEMS & INSTRUMENTS

  • Flight Control Systems
  • Engines and Related Systems
  • Fuel and Electrical Systems
  • Powertrain Systems
  • Flight Instruments

 

AVIATION PHYSIOLOGY

  • Vision In-Flight
  • Spatial Disorientation
  • Respiration and Altitude
  • Alcohol, Drugs and Performance

 

FLIGHT PLANNING & DECISION-MAKING

  • Planning & Organizing Flights
  • Decision-Making
  • Cockpit Resource Management

 

BASIC NAVIGATION

  • Aeronautical Charts
  • Flight Computers (E6B)
  • Pilotage & Dead Reckoning
  • Sources of Flight Information

 

RADIO NAVIGATION

  • VOR, ADF, LORAN & GPS

 

COMMUNICATIONS & PERFORMANCE

  • Radio Communications
  • Radar and ATC Services
  • Predicting Performance
  • Weight and Balance

 

HOVERING OPERATIONS

  • Flying into Controlled Airspace
  • Proper Radio Use & Practice
  • Helicopter Ops at Controlled Airports

 

PRIMARY MANEUVERS

  • Straight and Level Flight
  • Climbs, Descents and Turns
  • Departures and Approaches

 

ADVANCED MANEUVERS

  • Maximum Performance Takeoff & Climb
  • High-Altitude Operations
  • Rapid Decelerations & Slope Operations
  • Night Operations

 

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

  • Autorotations
  • Emergency Situations
  • Systems and Equipment Malfunctions

 

METEOROLOGY FOR PILOTS

  • Basic Weather Theory.
  • Weather Patterns
  • Weather Hazards

 

INTERPRETING WEATHER DATA

  • Printed Reports and Forecasts
  • Graphic Weather Products
  • Sources of Weather Information

 

GROUND OPERATIONS

  • Preflight and Starting
  • Shutdown Procedures
  • Safety Considerations

 

SPECIAL OPERATIONS

  • Confined Area and Pinnacle Operations
  • Float Operations

DSU, Horizon Helicopters Announce Flight Training Partnership

Delaware State University and Horizon Helicopters, Inc. Monday signed an agreement to create a flight training partnership. The partnership will be the first between a helicopter training organization and a university or college aviation program in the northeastern U.S.

Alton Thompson, DSU provost and vice president of Academic Affairs, Amir Mohammadi, DSU executive vice president, and Capt. Stephen Speed, director of the DSU Aviation Program, joined Horizon Helicopters owner Harry Griffith in signing the agreement.

See more at:
http://delawarebusinessdaily.com/2013/08/dsu-horizon-helicopters-announce-flight-training-partnership

DSU, Horizon Helicopter Ink Agreement to Provide Flight Training

Delaware State University has expanded the training options of its Aviation Program by signing a new agreement with Horizon Helicopters, Inc., of Newark, Del.

The agreement – signed today at the Horizon Helicopters facility – establishes a University flight training partnership with the company to provide helicopter training as a new option in DSU’s Professional Pilot concentration of its Bachelor of Science in Aviation Program.

Now DSU aviation students can choose between flight training on fixed-wing aircraft and/or on helicopters. The helicopter flight training will take place at the Horizon facility in Newark. The new partnership also opens the door for military veterans to use their Department of Defense benefits to enroll in the program.

FAA Licesnse Requirements - VA Commercial Pilot Training Program

After more than 25 years of training and preparing helicopter pilots for flight operations in the corporate market, commercial sector, medical transportation industry, law enforcement, military service and even just training private pilots to fly for their own enjoyment, Horizon is proud to announce that we are approved by the Veterans Administration (VA) to offer flight training to Veterans of all ages looking to advance their skills and career in helicopter flight.

  • Under the current VA benefits package, Veterans qualify for FREE advanced-level flight training to receive their Commercial Pilot License!
  • Although the VA Program is designed to pay for a Commercial License, or second phase of your flight training, candidates must first obtain their Private Pilot License. Horizon offers options to help students who have never flown or do not currently hold a Private Pilot License to get one. Ask about our discounts for purchasing flight time in bulk as well as more traditional financing options to help get you off the ground.

To get started, contact your VA Benefits Administrator to see what your current benefits level is and then call us to schedule an appointment to review your flight training experience, flight training goals and set up a training schedule.

Pilots must meet current FAA safety and eligibility rules and enroll in a VA certified program.

You served our country and we're grateful!
Now let Horizon help you use the benefits you've earned to create the
the valuable skills neccessary to take your career to new heights!

CALL US TODAY!
(302) 368-5135

Just a few of the many pilots that have graduated from Horizon Helicopters
and have become part of our extended family!

So you've got your license, now what?

Need somewhere to land instead of just flying around locally? We've gathered a few places that have interesting things to do or great restaurants as well as a variety of airspace, including uncontrolled airports and Class D or higher. We'll also add some ideas for longer trips. Send us your feedback on any places and events you've found and would like to share. ~Enjoy The Ride!

ANNIE'S PARAMOUNT STEAK & SEAFOOD HOUSE
We've just received permission from Michael J. Katinas, President of Annie's to land on their property located at the intersection of Kent Narrows Way N and Kent Narrows Road. You can call ahead for take out by calling 410-827-7103 and asking for Michael, Helen, Aliki or Kim. But, if you're making the trip, feel free to stay for a minute and enjoy their great atmosphere and friendly staff. The landing site is about 900 ft from the restaurant. Check it out before you arrive at www.annies.biz

When you expect extraordinary - choose Annie's!!
500 Kent Narrows Way North, Grasonville, Maryland 21638

CHESTER COUNTY AIRPORT (40N)
(21 NM, Course: 354)

The Flying Machine Cafe has a great aviation atmosphere with a lot of RC models of new and WWII airplanes, helicopters (OK, just one) and a view overlooking the runways. You can watch the coming and goings of all kinds and sizes of aircraft while you eat, including the local P51 Mustang. The terminal building was built in 1994, so its fairly new. The atmosphere is cheery and their food is quite good. This is a great spot to go for a sandwich or salad; its easy to get to, has good food and a very pleasant atmosphere. The BLT, chili and salads are all excellent and are my normal selections when I go. They no longer have the Sunday morning buffet, but they do have a nice menu all the time. The restaurant is open 11am -10pm Monday thru Friday and 8am - 10pm Saturday and Sunday. Click on the link for more info and menus.

The airport is fairly easy to find. Look for the water tower on the west end of the runway, which has a flashing strobe. An then you'll see the row of hangers that parallels the runway on the north side. Park to the west of the café, but beyond the reserved spots for the local FBO (marked on the tarmac).

MASSEY AERODROME (MD1)
(21 NM, Course: 201)

Massey is an Airport/Museum and would make a nice day trip. Normal hours are: Tuesday - Saturday: 10:00AM - 4:00PM and anytime by appointment. Massey has a single grass strip which may not be the easiest to find; but it is in the GPS airport database. Check out their web site (Massey Air Museum) for coming events.

We've been to Massey several times and the airstrip can get wet and soggy in the spring or after lots of rain; obviously not a problem with the helicopter, but you will be walking around some, so just something to think about.
SMOKETOWN AIRPORT, PA (S37)
(33 NM, Course: 329)

T. BURK & CO. DELI RESTAURANT is about a block from the Smoketown Airport, but what a great place! Its one of my favorite places, very clean, new and has individual tables with a really nice bright atmosphere decorated with local crafts. Not only is the food very good, they have a nice selection of sandwiches and salads. The sandwiches range from the normal stuff like Reubens and Subs to some pretty fancy sounding things like Chicken Cordon Bleu. Salads are very fresh and crispy and also ranged from the standard garden salad to a Chicken and Cashew Salad. Personally, my favorite is the House Greens with Amish hot bacon dressing and is very similar to one my mother made. All food is made on the premises and everything I saw looked great. Prices are very reasonable. They are open 10am to 8 pm, Monday through Saturday, but closed on Sundays. Find more info and their menu at T. Burk & Co. Deli

If you go on a Sunday, or just want a full meal, there is another restaurant which is an easy walk. Its called Alex Austins Steakhouse and is also about a block from the airport. We havent been there, but it looked pretty nice from the outside and a sign indicated it was open daily 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. If you try it, let us know how it is.

The old sandwich shop which is only a few yards from the airport is now a Pizza place, but its also closed Sunday. I havent tried it yet, simply because I think T. Burks is so good. There are a couple of other sandwich shops and an Italian place nearby also, but can't tell you much about them either and they are a little further walk.

Smoketown is close to the Route 896 and Route 30 intersection, which is about a mile from the outlet stores that abound in this area. They used to have an Airport Car that you could use; otherwise, you might be able to catch a ride with someone; there's usually a crowd just hanging out at the airport and they always seem like pretty nice people, contrary to some airports.

MILLVILLE, NJ (MIV)
(35 NM, Course: 129)

VERNAS FLIGHTLINE RESTAURANT is on the airport and a converted WWII building, as are essentially all of the buildings on the field. It's pretty small, but worth the trip. The food is excellent and not expensive. I've been told to try the P47 hamburger, but since we went for breakfast, we didn't make it. I've had the P-47 omelet and Gravy and Sausage, which were both great! They don't have an on-line menu, but I don't think you will be disappointed. It's normally pretty crowded, which is always a good sign, but I've never had to wait. They are open 6am to 2pm, 7 days a week.

Millville is a nice trip; its short and they have an AAF Museum (Millville Army Airfield) on field. The museum has a display of World War II memorabilia. Located in the airport, just across from the primary flight line (Big Sky Aviation), the museum is open to visitors from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on weekdays and from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekends.

Millville has a very nice airshow each summer. It gets pretty crowded, so you may want to drive although that gets crowded too. For more info on the airshow and other events at Millville, you can go to the Museum link above.
LANCASTER, PA (LNS)
(39 NM, Course: 329)

Fiorentino's Restaurant, an upscale restaurant with a decidedly nice atmosphere, very similar to any nice evening restaurant. Prices for most evening entrees are in the $10 to $13 range and the selection is very good. The food was good and worth the trip, although it has been a couple of years since I've been there. Breakfast entrees can be had for $5 or less and a light menu is served on the deck at very reasonable prices. The restaurant was new about 2003 and is nicely maintained with lots of glass overlooking runway 8 - 31.

This is an easy trip to a controlled field other than Wilmington. The controllers at Lancaster are always pleasant, so this would be a good choice for an early venture. This offers a cross-country over the Amish country; try this one sometime! If you work your trip carefully, you can fly over the Strasburg Railroad and the steam train is a really neat sight from the air.

READING, PA (RDG)
(45NM, Course: 358)

The Malibooz Bar and Grill replaces the old Wild Wings Café is clean and the food decent if you are in the area. On the other hand, there isn't anything really special about the place although they do have a great view of runway 8 - 31. Well, they do have really cool T-shirts. The restaurant opens at 11 a.m., Noon on Sundays.

This is a nice trip to practice at a controlled field and the scenery is gorgeous with the mountains in the citys background. The first time we went; we called the Tower, as is our normal helicopter procedure, and the Tower controllers returned us to Approach, so you might expect this if you go. You can park behind the tower, just tell the tower you are going to the restaurant.

The Mid-Atlantic Air Museum is across the field with a very nice collection of WWII aircraft and it alone is worth the trip. Every year Reading has a very large airshow in approximately late August. It used to alternate with the Paris airshow, but no longer does that. If you want to see some of the best professional airshow pilots in the world without traveling several hundred miles, this is a short trip that will take care of that for you. They are open from 9:30 AM to 4:00 PM seven days a week.

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